It's time to speak up.

Information for youth about prevention, advocacy, and treatment from the Hepatitis Education Project in Seattle, Washington.
www.hepeducation.org
contact1@hepeducation.org


Hepatitis A  Hepatitis B  Hepatitis C   Ask me anything  
Reblogged from symphonyofawesomeness
Reblogged from psicologicamenteblog
Reblogged from actgnetwork
actgnetwork:

If you live in the Seattle area you have a wonderful opportunity to meet the scientist who discovered HIV Francoise Barre-Sinoussi! She will be speaking at 7 tonight in the Pelton Auditorium on the Fred Hutch campus. The event is free and open to the public. Don’t miss this!!
#hiv #aids #seattle #research #science #health #fredhutch http://ift.tt/1qw8X20

actgnetwork:

If you live in the Seattle area you have a wonderful opportunity to meet the scientist who discovered HIV Francoise Barre-Sinoussi! She will be speaking at 7 tonight in the Pelton Auditorium on the Fred Hutch campus. The event is free and open to the public. Don’t miss this!!
#hiv #aids #seattle #research #science #health #fredhutch http://ift.tt/1qw8X20

Reblogged from ppaction
ppaction:

We’ve come a long way in the past 94 years — but we’ve still got work to do.
h/t Feministing

ppaction:

We’ve come a long way in the past 94 years — but we’ve still got work to do.

h/t Feministing

Reblogged from sex-specs

ppaction:

sex-specs:

August 26 is Women’s Equality Day! Today we celebrate the anniversary of passage of the 19th Amendment, which granted American women the right to vote.

It was a hard-won fight, and some of their more spectacular feats make us wonder how anyone was brave enough to go toe-to-toe with the suffragettes. They were the hardest of hardcore. Here’s what we mean.

One. Million. Signatures.
Way before social media, the suffragettes were able to collect more than a million signatures in pen and ink, all through hand-to-hand contact. They displayed them as they marched down Fifth Avenue in New York with 20,000 supporters and an estimated half-million people in the crowd in 1917.

They see your charity marathon and raise you 200 miles.
To push the vote in New York in 1912, there was a 12-day, 170 mile “Hike to Albany.” The next year, the suffragettes’ “Army of the Hudson” marched 225 miles from New Jersey to Washington, D.C.

Pickets and prison time.
The National Women’s Party made history by creating the first-ever picket of the White House. The “Silent Sentinels” and their banners were present six days a week from January 1917 to June of 1919. Over 1,000 women participated in these protests, and many were arrested, refused bail, and made to serve time in solitary confinement, where they experienced beatings and force-feeding when they went on hunger strikes.

Words burned in effigy.
The suffragettes set “watchfires” as protest outside the New York City Opera while President Wilson was speaking there. Activists transcribed his words as he spoke them and then publicly burned the paper in the fires outside—symbolically condemning the hypocrisy of his words about international freedom while women were denied the right to vote.

Your big-name benefit concert pales in comparison.
The 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession was reported to include nine bands, four mounted brigades, three heralds, twenty-four floats and more than 5,000 marchers. The march concluded at the Department of the Treasury, where they then put on a play with ideas like Hope and Justice personified by women in flowing gowns.

We’ve come a long way since 1920, but the fight for the social, political, and economic equality of the sexes is by no means over. Honor the suffragettes’ fight by pledging to vote on November 4.

xoxo,
Planned Parenthood Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota

(source)

So. Awesome.

Reblogged from nychealth
nychealth:

Prevent Cancer Today: #VaccinateHPV!
About 79 million people in the U.S. have human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and another 14 million get HPV each year.  Who should get vaccinated and why?
HPV infection can cause genital warts and can lead to cancer many years later
Each year, there are approximately 33,200 HPV-associated cancers in the U.S. – about 20,600 in women and 12,600 in men. HPV cancers include cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers.
Early vaccination and prevention is critical for cancer prevention, which is why it is especially important for parents to take control and bring their pre-teens and teens to the doctor to receive the vaccine.
The best way to prevent HPV is with a vaccine, which may be up to 99% effective in preventing these cancers.
The vaccine is recommended for all girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 12. It is important to vaccinate your child now, before he or she is old enough to be exposed to HPV. The vaccine may be given to pre-teens as young as 9.
Females aged 13 through 26 and males aged 13 through 21 should be vaccinated if they have not previously received the vaccine.
Men who have sex with men, who are at greater risk for HPV infection, and men with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS) aged 22 through 26 should also receive the HPV vaccine.
The vaccine is safe!
Nearly 67 million doses of HPV vaccine have been given in the U.S. through March 2014, and studies provide continued evidence of the vaccine’s safety. The most common side-effects are mild, temporary symptoms, including soreness where the shot was given and fever, headache and nausea.
Save yourself an additional trip to the doctor!
The HPV vaccine is safe to receive with the other recommended adolescent vaccines. Many children also see health care professionals for physicals before school or for participation in sports, camping events, travel and so on. These are all great opportunities for your preteen or teen to get the HPV vaccine.

Visit our HPV page to learn more & ask your child’s provider about the HPV vaccine today!

nychealth:

Prevent Cancer Today: #VaccinateHPV!

About 79 million people in the U.S. have human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and another 14 million get HPV each year.  Who should get vaccinated and why?

HPV infection can cause genital warts and can lead to cancer many years later

  • Each year, there are approximately 33,200 HPV-associated cancers in the U.S. – about 20,600 in women and 12,600 in men. HPV cancers include cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers.
  • Early vaccination and prevention is critical for cancer prevention, which is why it is especially important for parents to take control and bring their pre-teens and teens to the doctor to receive the vaccine.

The best way to prevent HPV is with a vaccine, which may be up to 99% effective in preventing these cancers.

  • The vaccine is recommended for all girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 12. It is important to vaccinate your child now, before he or she is old enough to be exposed to HPV. The vaccine may be given to pre-teens as young as 9.
  • Females aged 13 through 26 and males aged 13 through 21 should be vaccinated if they have not previously received the vaccine.
  • Men who have sex with men, who are at greater risk for HPV infection, and men with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS) aged 22 through 26 should also receive the HPV vaccine.

The vaccine is safe!

  • Nearly 67 million doses of HPV vaccine have been given in the U.S. through March 2014, and studies provide continued evidence of the vaccine’s safety. The most common side-effects are mild, temporary symptoms, including soreness where the shot was given and fever, headache and nausea.

Save yourself an additional trip to the doctor!

  • The HPV vaccine is safe to receive with the other recommended adolescent vaccines. Many children also see health care professionals for physicals before school or for participation in sports, camping events, travel and so on. These are all great opportunities for your preteen or teen to get the HPV vaccine.

Visit our HPV page to learn more & ask your child’s provider about the HPV vaccine today!

Reblogged from thinksquad
thinksquad:

$1,000 Pill For Hepatitis C Spurs Debate Over Drug Prices

Federal regulators this month opened a new era in the treatment of a deadly liver virus that infects three to five times more people than HIV. Now the question is: Who will get access to the new drug for hepatitis C, and when?

The drug sofosbuvir (brand name Sovaldi) will cost $1,000 per pill. A typical course of treatment will last 12 weeks and run $84,000, plus the cost of necessary companion drugs. Some patients may need treatment for twice as long.

Hepatitis researchers call the drug a landmark in the treatment of this deadly infection. More than 90 percent of patients who get the new drug can expect to be cured of their hepatitis C infection, with few side effects.

More than 3 million Americans are infected with hepatitis C, and perhaps 170 million people have the disease worldwide. By comparison, about 1.1 million Americans have HIV, which has infected about 34 million people globally.

thinksquad:

$1,000 Pill For Hepatitis C Spurs Debate Over Drug Prices

Federal regulators this month opened a new era in the treatment of a deadly liver virus that infects three to five times more people than HIV. Now the question is: Who will get access to the new drug for hepatitis C, and when?

The drug sofosbuvir (brand name Sovaldi) will cost $1,000 per pill. A typical course of treatment will last 12 weeks and run $84,000, plus the cost of necessary companion drugs. Some patients may need treatment for twice as long.

Hepatitis researchers call the drug a landmark in the treatment of this deadly infection. More than 90 percent of patients who get the new drug can expect to be cured of their hepatitis C infection, with few side effects.

More than 3 million Americans are infected with hepatitis C, and perhaps 170 million people have the disease worldwide. By comparison, about 1.1 million Americans have HIV, which has infected about 34 million people globally.

Reblogged from iheartguts
iheartguts:

I Wanna Be Your Liver
© I Heart Guts

iheartguts:

I Wanna Be Your Liver

© I Heart Guts

Reblogged from americasnexttopdoctor
americasnexttopdoctor:

There are more victims suffering Hepatitis C than HIV in America and also globally. 

americasnexttopdoctor:

There are more victims suffering Hepatitis C than HIV in America and also globally. 

Reblogged from healthfitnesshumour
Reblogged from pubhealth
pubhealth:

World Hepatitis Day 2013: This is hepatitis. Know it. Confront it.
This year on the 28th July we will be celebrating our 6th World Hepatitis Day, working in partnership with the World Health Organisation (WHO). 
(From World Hepatitis Alliance)

pubhealth:

World Hepatitis Day 2013: This is hepatitis. Know it. Confront it.

This year on the 28th July we will be celebrating our 6th World Hepatitis Day, working in partnership with the World Health Organisation (WHO).

(From World Hepatitis Alliance)

Reblogged from actgnetwork
actgnetwork:

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month! Check out this info graphic from Whitman-Walker Health in DC about the different types of hepatitis and the treatments available. Check out the CDC’s website to find a testing center near you.

actgnetwork:

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month! Check out this info graphic from Whitman-Walker Health in DC about the different types of hepatitis and the treatments available. Check out the CDC’s website to find a testing center near you.

Reblogged from sciencesourceimages
sciencesourceimages:

HEV - Hepatitis E Virus. HEV belongs to the togaviridae group. This hepatitis causes diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. Hepatitis E is prevalent in most developing countries, and common in any country with a hot climate. It is widespread in Southeast Asia, northern and central Africa, India, and Central America. It is spread mainly by the fecal-oral route due to fecal contamination of water supplies or food; person-to-person transmission is uncommon. The incubation period following exposure to the hepatitis E virus ranges from three to eight weeks. Viral magnification 3,030,000x at 10 cm and image colorization with HDRI treatments on a Transmission Electron Micrograph view (TEM). Viral diameter approximately: 32 - 34 nm.
© James Cavallini / Science Source

sciencesourceimages:

HEV - Hepatitis E Virus. HEV belongs to the togaviridae group. This hepatitis causes diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. Hepatitis E is prevalent in most developing countries, and common in any country with a hot climate. It is widespread in Southeast Asia, northern and central Africa, India, and Central America. It is spread mainly by the fecal-oral route due to fecal contamination of water supplies or food; person-to-person transmission is uncommon. The incubation period following exposure to the hepatitis E virus ranges from three to eight weeks. Viral magnification 3,030,000x at 10 cm and image colorization with HDRI treatments on a Transmission Electron Micrograph view (TEM). Viral diameter approximately: 32 - 34 nm.

© James Cavallini / Science Source

Reblogged from oupacademic
Globally, each year, 1.4 million persons lose their life to viral hepatitis, approaching the number of deaths from HIV/AIDS (1.5 million) and surpassing mortality from tuberculosis and malaria (1.2 million each).

John Ward, World Hepatitis Day 2013: This is hepatitis. Know it. Confront it.

To raise awareness of the third annual World Hepatitis Day, the editors of Clinical Infectious Diseases and the Journal of Infectious Diseases have made a World Hepatitis Day Virtual Issue of related articlesfreely available throughout the August.  

(via oupacademic)
Reblogged from nychealth
nychealth:

Today is World Hepatitis Day!
The Health Department, the Fund for Public Health in New York and five community partners – the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Cornell Medical College, VNSNY Choice and HealthFirst – announced today that they have received a $10 million Health Care Innovation Award from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services to focus on hepatitis C (HCV).
Project INSPIRE NYC (Innovate & Network to Stop HCV & Prevent complications via Integrating care, Responding to needs and Engaging patients & providers) aims to achieve:
Better care, by increasing the number of patients starting hepatitis C therapy, strengthening management of behavioral health problems, reducing hospitalizations and emergency department visits, and maintaining a high level of satisfaction among enrollees;
Better health, with increased hepatitis C cure rates, fewer hepatitis C-related complications, and increased screening for depression and alcohol abuse; and
Lower costs, by reducing expenses from preventable hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and complications of hepatitis C infection.


Hepatitis C Facts:
An estimated 146,500 New Yorkers have chronic hepatitis C, though about half do not know that they are infected.
Hepatitis C is a liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis C virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness.
Hepatitis C is usually spread when blood from a person infected with hepatitis C enters the blood stream of someone who is not infected. Today, people most often become infected with hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. Before 1992, when widespread screening of the blood supply began in the United States, hepatitis C was also commonly spread through blood transfusions.
Most people living with hepatitis C have few symptoms of illness until 10 to 30 years after initial infection, when life-threatening complications can develop. People with hepatitis C are at risk for developing cirrhosis, liver cancer, and other types of liver damage.
Given unprecedented advances in hepatitis C treatment, a cure has become achievable for most. Treatment is now shorter, less toxic, and more effective than in the past.



 NYC Health is releasing a number of new resources including an updated website and site locator, informational video, Risk Assessment postcard, Hep C Facts booklet, and a City Health Information Bulletin for primary care providers, as well as a mobile app. New Yorkers can also text LIVER to 877877 to be connected with Hepatitis C testing and care services.

Read our Press Release for more information and the full resource list.

nychealth:

Today is World Hepatitis Day!

The Health Department, the Fund for Public Health in New York and five community partners – the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Cornell Medical College, VNSNY Choice and HealthFirst – announced today that they have received a $10 million Health Care Innovation Award from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services to focus on hepatitis C (HCV).

Project INSPIRE NYC (Innovate & Network to Stop HCV & Prevent complications via Integrating care, Responding to needs and Engaging patients & providers) aims to achieve:

  1. Better care, by increasing the number of patients starting hepatitis C therapy, strengthening management of behavioral health problems, reducing hospitalizations and emergency department visits, and maintaining a high level of satisfaction among enrollees;
  2. Better health, with increased hepatitis C cure rates, fewer hepatitis C-related complications, and increased screening for depression and alcohol abuse; and
  3. Lower costs, by reducing expenses from preventable hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and complications of hepatitis C infection.

Hepatitis C Facts:

  • An estimated 146,500 New Yorkers have chronic hepatitis C, though about half do not know that they are infected.
  • Hepatitis C is a liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis C virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness.
  • Hepatitis C is usually spread when blood from a person infected with hepatitis C enters the blood stream of someone who is not infected. Today, people most often become infected with hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. Before 1992, when widespread screening of the blood supply began in the United States, hepatitis C was also commonly spread through blood transfusions.
  • Most people living with hepatitis C have few symptoms of illness until 10 to 30 years after initial infection, when life-threatening complications can develop. People with hepatitis C are at risk for developing cirrhosis, liver cancer, and other types of liver damage.
  • Given unprecedented advances in hepatitis C treatment, a cure has become achievable for most. Treatment is now shorter, less toxic, and more effective than in the past.


NYC Health is releasing a number of new resources including an updated website and site locator, informational video, Risk Assessment postcard, Hep C Facts booklet, and a City Health Information Bulletin for primary care providers, as well as a mobile app. New Yorkers can also text LIVER to 877877 to be connected with Hepatitis C testing and care services.

Read our Press Release for more information and the full resource list.